Using a Synology host for NFS file mounts with Fedora 31.

Often I use NFS as a simple way to keep my home directory consistent across multiple (and ephemeral) VM’s at a time. The Synology NAS makes this really easy.

Enable NFS on your Synology NAS.

The default NFS version is v3, v4 can be enabled. I’m using v3 for this demonstration.  Open the control panel and check the “enable NFS” box.

control-panel1

Create an NFS export on the Synology NAS.

Create a new shared folder and give it a name and select a volume to back it.

control-panel2

You can encrypt the folder if you wish.

control-panel3

You can use the back end Synology features such as file compression and quotas.

control-panel4

Make a note of your settings. As this has a folder of “nfsexports” and it’s on “volume3”, my NFS export path will be “/volume3/nfsexports”

control-panel5

You can add specific users for security, I usually configure a specific host to have access. I also squash users.

control-panel7

I’m now in a position where I can mount the NFS volume on my Fedora server. The only issue is that Fedora will be expecting NFS v4 out of the box, and i’m running v3.

To resolve this I edit the NFS client configuration on my server to expect v3 by default. This can also be done on the command line with options

The config file options are

[root@hansolo nfs]# grep -v ^# /etc/nfsmount.conf
[ NFSMount_Global_Options ]
Defaultvers=3
Nfsvers=3

The command-line test is

 mount -t nfs -o nfsvers=3 192.168.0.241:/volume3/nfsexports /mnt -vv

At this point I can go back to the Fedora cockpit and mount my nfs volume

Log in to cockpit as the administrative user

cockpit-1

Click on Storage and select NFS mounts

fedora-1

Specify the mount credentials

fedora-2

Then check it’s been mounted

fedora-3

It’s as simple as that.

Any, and all comments welcome.

Matt –

 

 

 

 

Using a Synology host for NFS file mounts with Fedora 31.

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